Counselor Corner – Transition and good-byes
Posted 08-12-2014 01:52PM

It’s that time of year when some AISJ families are transitioning to move to their next posting or to re-patriate back to their home country.  What a wonderful and exciting time for families!  A move can bring about new options, new friends, new foods and favorite places.  And although many of you have been through these transitions, we think it is important to share a few tips to help kids and families through the process.

Things to remember during transition time:

  • Focus on the genuine positives – lots of new friends to be made,  new places to explore and exciting new foods to try but also acknowledge the short term difficulties that will most likely happen
  • Make sure your children know that you as parents will also have adjustment difficulties but reassure them that you are confident it will be a positive move in the end
  • Encourage your children to talk about their feelings and set aside time to actually do this
  • Plan more time to be available to your children, even if you have to give up some of your own personal or social time
  • Try to keep things as simple as possible to alleviate excess stress in your children’s lives
  • Make time for good-byes before you move
    •  Revisit some favorite family places and take photographs
    •  Encourage children to keep a journal to record how they are feeling
    •  Have a party or reminisce with family and friends
    •  Tell friends that you appreciate their friendship
    •  Make amends and get closure with difficult relationships
    • Plan something to look forward to after moving
    • Let your child’s new school know about where you came from, share some information about your child and keep the lines of communication open with your child’s new counselor and their teachers
    • Once you have moved, keep an eye on your children for signs of concern in their adjustment (some of these signs may be developmental or just a passing phase but it is important to be aware of your children’s behaviors and actions)
      • Significant weight loss or gain
      • Concerned feedback from teachers
      • Frequent illness, fatigue or major mood changes for a sustained period of time
      • The unwillingness to go to school or to participate in other activities that they used to enjoy doing
      • And most importantly, remember that change and transition will contribute to the resiliency of your child and that trait will serve them very well in their lives

Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed and courageously make a difference.


Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed and courageously make a difference.


Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed and courageously make a difference.

Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed and courageously make a difference.


Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed and courageously make a difference.


Together we dare to imagine, inspire to succeed and courageously make a difference.


powered by finalsite